Hall MeadowPrimary School

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Contact Details

The name, postal address and telephone number of the school, and the name of a person to whom enquiries should be addressed is:

Head Teacher : Mrs Tania Watts, Packer Road, Lake Avenue, Kettering, Northamptonshire, NN15 7RP

The school can be contacted on 01536 417627


Admissions

Our admission number and our maximum class size is 30 pupils.


Prospectus


Ofsted 


Performance Data

Our analysis of the most recently collated SATs tests results is available in the in the Key Files & Reports panel in the sidebar.


Curriculum

Teaching Core Skills in English

Speaking and Listening

One of the most important skills that the children need to learn is to speak and to listen. Their capacity to talk is a key priority right throughout their primary school life. Children are given opportunities to talk in a whole range of contexts to develop their language for social, learning, and formal situations. Vocabulary is explicitly taught and the children are placed in contexts where they are encouraged to use new vocabulary. Philosophy for children and inquiry learning are strategies that help to facilitate language development and deepen the children’s thinking around learning and life. The children are encouraged to listen carefully to each other and respect the views and opinion of others, even if they do not choose to accept their view point. The conventions of speaking and listening are explicitly taught and the children are given opportunities to present their ideas to each other through drama and formal presentations. The children also lead school assemblies to present their interests and views to one other.

Reading

Reading is considered to be a key priority as part of the children’s learning experience. Our aim is to get all of the children to recognise the importance of reading and identify this as a crucial life skill. We hope that, through engaging teaching and learning opportunities, the children will develop a passion for reading. We recognise that the children’s reading skills will largely determine their access to the rest of the curriculum. No one reading scheme is used. We use the London University ‘Book Banding’ system to provide texts at an appropriate national curriculum level. In this respect, we are able to integrate a whole range of quality fiction and non-fiction text for the children. A combination of independent, guided, class text study, partnership reading and home reading strategies are used to develop the reading process. We actively encourage the children to read a wide genre of literature including online and ICT presentation of material. The children are engaged in the assessment of their progress and encouraged to record their home reading in a journal. To facilitate children’s understanding, the teaching of reading skills focuses on the development of meaning, visual and semantic cues and errors that children make in respect of these. Phonics is a visual aspect of the reading process that links the visual representation of sounds to how they are articulated; this supports children with the process of decoding words.

Phonics and Spelling

As with the reading process, we do not adhere to any particular scheme for teaching phonics, preferring to select from a range of quality strategies and resources to support teaching and learning. Our approach is eclectic; we use a mixture of reading schemes for interventions, synthetic phonics and the common exception words.
We address the teaching of phonics on a daily basis, using a consistent approach to assess of children’s progress. We also use a synthetic approach in that we teach and assess the children’s knowledge of the 44 phonemes at Key Stage One and consolidate this learning at Key Stage Two. The phases of learning denoted by the ‘Letters and Sounds’ curriculum document provides a framework for teaching phonics at Reception and Key Stage One. To appeal to all aspect of the sensory child and to provide rigor in practice, this is supported by strategies and resources outlined in ‘Jolly Phonics’ and ‘Read Write Inc’.   At the end of Year One, the children take the national phonics screening test. Those who do not attain in line with national expectations receive intensive support at Year Two.

At Key Stage Two, children who are less proficient in phonics are supported through continued intervention. This includes the use of ICT provision and targeted support. Phonics continues to be taught as an integral aspect of learning to spell where the children engage in focused, discrete and partner work to explore spelling patterns. Home learning also consolidates phonic knowledge through a system of core, challenge and extension opportunities linked to the children’s current levels of attainment. Children who continue to experience difficulties in their knowledge are offered an intervention strategy which links reading to writing through ‘Fresh Start Phonics’.

Writing

The key skills of writing are taught rigorously and in context; this includes daily handwriting, spelling and grammar sessions for all children across all ages.   Children are extensively involved in reviewing their progress and reflect on a daily basis about their progress in this area. The children are expected to regularly respond to marking. ICT is also extensively used to support the writing process. Although there is a clear focus on the development of skills, exciting learning opportunities are used as a stimulus for writing. The children are also afforded a lot of choice about what they write about and this helps to secure their interest and engagement. A real purpose for writing given and the children are actively encouraged to share their ideas with each other.


Behaviour


Pupil Premium

Overview

What is Pupil Premium?

Pupil Premium is additional funding that is received by schools to help raise the attainment of, what the Department for Education refer to as, disadvantaged pupils. A sum of approximately £1,900 per eligible pupil is received each year. To qualify for Pupil Premium funding, a child will have been entitled to receive free school meals at some point in the past six years. Additional funding is also provided for pupils who have been: looked after for one day or more; adopted from care or who have left care but subject to a residency order, a child arrangement order or a guardianship order.

How do we use the funds at Hall Meadow?

Two key principles determine how we spend Pupil Premium funding

  • The child’s emotional, physical and mental wellbeing is our first priority and providing opportunities that will secure high levels of emotional engagement in school and the learning process.
  • The child’s cognitive needs; thus we fund initiatives and resources that ensure that a child achieves in line with their peers.

Examples of how additional funding might be spent include:

  • Individual mentoring which aims to accelerate a pupil’s progress in the core areas of learning and develops links between home and school.
  • Subsidising or fully funding the cost of residential trips.
  • Subsidising or fully funding the cost of extra-curricular activities such as day trips or visitors.
  • Access to specific emotional support such a play therapy.
  • Individual wellbeing intervention to develop social, emotional and mental resilience.
  • Providing out of hours activities such as a sports club.
  • Providing specific learning resources that will help to accelerate a child’s progress.
  • Music tuition or other creative opportunities that a child has expressed a preference for.
  • A contribution towards before and after school care.
  • Funding access to IT equipment to support home learning.

Sports Funding 

OlympicRingsValues

Following Britain's success in the Olympics, as part of a government initiate, every school has received a grant of £9,500 to create sustainable provision to raise attainment in Physical Education. Our priorities at Hall Meadow are as follows.

  • Fund interschool competitive opportunities
  • To develop children's positive mental attitude to enhance performance through .b
  • To train staff and our parent to provide, sustainable, out of hours extra- curricular sporting opportunities
  • To develop the capacity of meal supervisors and sports leaders to promote physical activity at playtime
  • To resource playtime sports activities
  • To promote links with physical activity and general wellbeing

 Physical Education

At Hall Meadow we support achievement in all areas of physical activity and for all of our children. We respect and value the unique physical abilities of our community and the contribution that participation can make to our social development. We work in teams to create an active, safe and high quality approach to all aspect of physical development to encourage health and fitness for life.


Special Educational Needs


Charging & Remissions


Vision & Ethos

At Hall Meadow we promote achievement in all areas and from all members of our community. We respect and value each person as unique. We work together to create an active, caring and high quality environment that encourages self-sustaining lifelong learning.

About Us

At Hall Meadow we promote achievement in all areas and from all members of our community. We respect and value each person as unique. We work together to create an active, caring and high quality environment that encourages self-sustaining lifelong learning.

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Teaching & Learning

We are a fully inclusive school, children are always at the centre of everything we do. The curriculum is innovative and provides maximum opportunities for intellectual, social and emotional development. The children study the National Curriculum through themes such as 'Keen to be Green'.

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Contact the School Office

Hall Meadow Primary School

Packer Road
Lake Avenue
Kettering
Northamptonshire
NN15 7RP
Phone : 01536 417627

Contact by EMail